“Debt collectors who attempt to collect payday loans often (if not almost always) violate the FDCPA by threatening to press criminal charges or have the borrower arrested for writing a ‘bad check.’ Payday lenders obtain postdated checks from the borrowers. Postdated checks which are eventually dishonored because of insufficient funds are not ‘bad checks’ under the criminal codes.
Payday loans are meant to give you access to money short term, until you get your next paycheck. Reasons for getting a payday loan range from unexpected expenses to working irregular hours at your job. But more often than you’d think, these loans don’t get paid off after two weeks and need to be rolled over into another loan. If you can, avoid doing this – it can result in you being stuck in a cycle of debt, and you’ll end up paying much more in fees than the amount you borrowed.
Unfortunately, not all of these payday lenders are reputable. The easiest way to tell the difference between a safe payday loan and a scam is to look for businesses that are properly licensed. All licensed payday lenders must follow strict laws passed by your state and the federal government. Since they have to follow these rules, you know you have more protections from fraud. 

The APR associated with your loan stands for the annual percentage rate, or the amount of interest you will be expected to pay in relation to the length of your loan term. Most of the time, the APR for short term loans ranges from 260.71% to 1825.00%, though this can vary somewhat. Although the APR associated with short term loans is higher than that associated with other forms of credit, it is still considerably less than the charges associated with overdrafts and nonsufficient funds. Please see below for a cost comparison.
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